Male Hair Loss

Male Hair Loss

Mostly men have a problem of hair loss in their life time, which is increasing with age. Mostly, 95% of hair thinning in men is male pattern hair loss (also known as androgenic alopecia).The incidence of pattern baldness varies from population to population and is based on genetic background. The reason for this type of baldness is DHT (Dihydrotestosterone), a powerful sex hormone, that can very badly affect the hair located on the head. DHT, hormone causes male hair loss by shortening the growth (anagen) phase of hair cycle, by decreasing the size of the hair follicle. The rate at which males lose hair is depending upon person to person.

Norwood Scale

The progression of male pattern baldness is generally classified on the Hamilton–Norwood scale, in the 1970s. which ranges from stages I to VII.

  • Type I. Minimal hair loss.
  • Type II. Insignificant hair loss at the temples.
  • Type III. The first stage that requires treatment.
  • Type III vertex. Receding hairline and thinning hair on the vertex.
  • Type IV. Bigger pattern on the vertex and hairline.
  • Type V. Patterns at both sites are bigger but a thin division line is still present.
  • Type VI. The bridge is gone but several strands of short fine hair may remain.
  • Type VII. The most severe form of hair loss. Little hair on the front or top of the head.

TYPE I

Male Hair Loss

WE DO NOT ACTUALLY OBSERVE HAIR LOSS

TYPE II

Male Hair Loss

MILD RECESSION OF THE FRONTAL LINE, SLIGHTLY EVIDENT AT THE TEMPLES

TYPE IIa

Male Hair Loss

DEEPEST RECESSION OF THE HAIRLINE REPRESENTS THE EARLIER STAGE OF HAIR LOSS

TYPE III

Male Hair Loss

DEEP RECESSION OF THE FRONTAL HAIR LINE TO THE SHAPE OF Μ

TYPE III a

Male Hair Loss

DEEPEST RECESSION OF THE FRONTAL LINE. THERE IS A MORE EXTENDED THINNING AREA

TYPE III vertex

Male Hair Loss

HAIR LOSS ALSO EXTENDS TO THE CROWN

TYPE IV

Male Hair Loss

EXTENDED THINNING IN THE CROWN. THE FRONTAL HAIRLINE TENDS TO MEET THE CROWN, BUT THERE IS STILL A STRIP OF HAIR SEPARATING HAIRLINE AND CROWN

TYPE IV a

Male Hair Loss

THINNING ON THE UPPER AND FRONTAL PART OF THE SCALP IN THE SHAPE OF A HEMICYCLE

TYPE v

Male Hair Loss

EXTENDED THINNING AT THE CROWN. THE FRONTAL HAIRLINE STARTS MEETING THE CROWN

TYPE v a

Male Hair Loss

EXTENDED THINNING ON THE UPPER AND FRONTAL PART OF THE SCALP

TYPE VI

Male Hair Loss

THINNING TENDS TO EXTEND TO THE SIDES OF THE SCALP

TYPE VII

Male Hair Loss

EXISTING HAIR IS RESTRICTED TO THE BACK AND SIDES OF THE SCALP

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Hair Transplant

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Faq’s

Hair transplantation is really about relocating (transplanting) the bald resistant hair follicles from the back of the head to the balding areas on the top of the head. This process works for a lifetime because the hair follicles taken from the back of the head are genetically resistant to baldness, regardless of where they are relocated to.

Hair transplantation, when done right, can be so natural that even your hair stylist will not know that you've had it done. But the skill and techniques of hair transplant surgeons does vary widely, as do their results. It's important to choose the right procedure and clinic to assure that you will get completely natural results.

A typical session of between 1,500 to 3,000 grafts normally involves a full day of surgery on an out patient basis. Most patients will arrive in the morning and will have their procedure completed by late afternoon.

Patients are given local anesthesia in the donor and recipient areas. Most patients find that once the anesthesia is given that they feel no pain or discomfort during the surgery. Following surgery patients will typically feel some amount of soreness and numbness, with some mild discomfort. Most patients are pleasantly surprised by how minimal the discomfort from the surgical procedure is.

The amount of grafts you will need ultimately depends on your degree of hair loss, now and in the future, and on how full you desire your hair to be.

With today’s very refined micro hair transplantation procedure the incisions are very small and less invasive than past procedures. This results in more rapid healing. Most patients feel fine within a day or two following surgery, although some numbness and mild soreness can be expected for several days following surgery.

Immediately following surgery a patient’s recipient area is typically pink with scabs forming around the micro incisions. These hundreds of tiny incisions will heal rapidly within a week to ten days.

During the first few days after the surgery a person’s hair transplants will be noticeable if there is no previous hair to mask these temporary scabs. However, most patients feel comfortable being in public without wearing a hat within 5 to 7 days following surgery.

Once the transplanted hair grows out the results should look entirely natural, even under close examination.

Normally it takes between three to five months following surgery before the transplanted hair follicles begin to grow new hair. The transplanted hair grows in very thin initially and gradually grows thicker and fuller over time. After one year a patient’s transplanted hair will be fully mature and will continue to grow for a life time.

Since the hair follicles that are transplanted to the balding areas are genetically resistant to going bald, they will continue to grow for a life time – just as if they had been left in the bald resistant donor area.

Many patients can return to their daily routines within 1 to 2 days, as long as they don't do anything too strenuous. Avoid rigorous exercise until the donor sutures are removed — generally after 10 to 12 days.

Male pattern baldness is the common type of hair loss that develops in most men at some stage. The condition is sometimes called androgenetic alopecia. It usually takes 15-25 years to go bald. However, some men go bald in fewer than five years.

Typically, at first the hair begins to thin (recede) at the sides (temples). At the same time, the hair usually becomes thin on the top of the head. A bald patch gradually develops in the middle of the scalp. The receding sides and the bald patch on the top (the crown) gradually enlarge and join together, leaving a patch at the front. The patch at the front eventually thins as well.

A rim of hair is often left around the back and sides of the scalp. In some men, this rim of hair also thins and goes to leave a completely bald scalp.

Nearly all men have some baldness by the time they are in their 60s. However, the age the hair loss starts is variable. About three in ten 30 year-olds and half of 50 year-olds are quite bald. Some women also develop a similar type of hair loss, mainly at the crown. Baldness in women is much more common after the menopause. About 13 in a 100 women have some baldness before the menopause, rising to 75 in a 100 over the age of 65.

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