Stem Cell Hair Transplant

Stem Cell Hair Transplant

What is Stem Cell?

A Stem cell is a biological cell that has the ability to divide. From that cell division, other cells can divide. A stem cell can divide again and again to make more stem cells, when it divides it makes an exact copy of same biological stem cell.

Stem cells are the first building blocks of our body. They are the mother cells and have potential to become any type of cell in the body. Stem cells can become cells of the hair, brain, heart, blood, bones, skin, muscles, etc. Stem cell research on humans began in the 1960's.

TYPES OF STEM cell

  • UMBILICAL STEM CELL
  • EMBRYONIC STEM CELL
  • ADULT STEM CELL
  • Fetal Stem Cells
  • Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS cells)

Umbilical stem cell

At birth blood in the umbilical cord is rich in blood-forming stem cells. The applications of cord blood are similar to those of adult bone marrow and are currently used to treat diseases. Umbilical or cord blood stem cells are tissue-specific.

Adult stem cells

Adult or somatic stem cells exist throughout the body after embryonic development and are found inside of different types of tissue. These stem cells have been found in tissues such as the brain, bone marrow, blood, blood vessels, skeletal muscles, skin, and the liver. They remain in a non-dividing state for years until activated by disease or tissue injury. Adult stem cells can divide or self-renew indefinitely, enabling them to generate a range of cell types from the originating organ or even regenerate the entire original organ. It is generally thought that adult stem cells are limited in their ability to differentiate based on their tissue of origin, but there is some evidence to suggest that they can differentiate to become other cell types.

Embryonic stem cells

Embryonic stem cells are derived from a four- or five-day-old human embryo that is in the blastocyst phase of development. In a normal pregnancy, the blastocyst stage continues until implantation of the embryo in the uterus, at which point the embryo is referred to as a fetus. This usually occurs by the end of the 10th week, However, when extracting embryonic stem cells, the blastocyst stage signals when to isolate stem cells by placing the "inner cell mass" of the blastocyst into a culture dish containing a nutrient-rich broth. Eventually, these undifferentiated cells can be stimulated to create specialized cells.

Fetal Stem Cells

Fetal stem cells are taken from the fetus. The developing baby is referred to as a fetus from approximately 10 weeks of gestation. Most tissues in a fetus contain stem cells that drive the rapid growth and development of the organs. Like adult stem cells, fetal stem cells are generally tissue-specific, and generate the mature cell types within the particular tissue or organ in which.

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are adult cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell–like state by being forced to express genes and factors important for maintaining the defining properties of embryonic stem cells. Although these cells meet the defining criteria for pluripotent stem cells, it is not known if iPSCs and embryonic stem cells differ in clinically significant ways. Mouse iPSCs were first reported in 2006, and human iPSCs were first reported in late 2007. Mouse iPSCs demonstrate important characteristics of pluripotent stem cells, including expressing stem cell markers, forming tumors containing cells from all three germ layers, and being able to contribute to many different tissues when injected into mouse embryos at a very early stage in development. Human iPSCs also express stem cell markers and are capable of generating cells characteristic of all three germ layers.

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Hair Transplant

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Faq’s

Hair transplantation is really about relocating (transplanting) the bald resistant hair follicles from the back of the head to the balding areas on the top of the head. This process works for a lifetime because the hair follicles taken from the back of the head are genetically resistant to baldness, regardless of where they are relocated to.

Hair transplantation, when done right, can be so natural that even your hair stylist will not know that you've had it done. But the skill and techniques of hair transplant surgeons does vary widely, as do their results. It's important to choose the right procedure and clinic to assure that you will get completely natural results.

A typical session of between 1,500 to 3,000 grafts normally involves a full day of surgery on an out patient basis. Most patients will arrive in the morning and will have their procedure completed by late afternoon.

Patients are given local anesthesia in the donor and recipient areas. Most patients find that once the anesthesia is given that they feel no pain or discomfort during the surgery. Following surgery patients will typically feel some amount of soreness and numbness, with some mild discomfort. Most patients are pleasantly surprised by how minimal the discomfort from the surgical procedure is.

The amount of grafts you will need ultimately depends on your degree of hair loss, now and in the future, and on how full you desire your hair to be.

With today’s very refined micro hair transplantation procedure the incisions are very small and less invasive than past procedures. This results in more rapid healing. Most patients feel fine within a day or two following surgery, although some numbness and mild soreness can be expected for several days following surgery.

Immediately following surgery a patient’s recipient area is typically pink with scabs forming around the micro incisions. These hundreds of tiny incisions will heal rapidly within a week to ten days.

During the first few days after the surgery a person’s hair transplants will be noticeable if there is no previous hair to mask these temporary scabs. However, most patients feel comfortable being in public without wearing a hat within 5 to 7 days following surgery.

Once the transplanted hair grows out the results should look entirely natural, even under close examination.

Normally it takes between three to five months following surgery before the transplanted hair follicles begin to grow new hair. The transplanted hair grows in very thin initially and gradually grows thicker and fuller over time. After one year a patient’s transplanted hair will be fully mature and will continue to grow for a life time.

Since the hair follicles that are transplanted to the balding areas are genetically resistant to going bald, they will continue to grow for a life time – just as if they had been left in the bald resistant donor area.

Many patients can return to their daily routines within 1 to 2 days, as long as they don't do anything too strenuous. Avoid rigorous exercise until the donor sutures are removed — generally after 10 to 12 days.

Stem cells have the remarkable potential to develop into many different cell types in the body during early life and growth. In addition, in many tissues they serve as a sort of internal repair system, dividing essentially without limit to replenish other cells as long as the person or animal is still alive. When a stem cell divides, each new cell has the potential either to remain a stem cell or become another type of cell with a more specialized function, such as a muscle cell, a red blood cell, or a brain cell.

Stem cells differ from other kinds of cells in the body. All stem cells—regardless of their source—have three general properties: they are capable of dividing and renewing themselves for long periods; they are unspecialized; and they can give rise to specialized cell types.

Stem cells are capable of dividing and renewing themselves for long periods. Unlike muscle cells, blood cells, or nerve cells—which do not normally replicate themselves—stem cells may replicate many times, or proliferate. A starting population of stem cells that proliferates for many months in the laboratory can yield millions of cells. If the resulting cells continue to be unspecialized, like the parent stem cells, the cells are said to be capable of long-term self-renewal.

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